Canadian Remedies for Organ Transplant Abuse in China

by David Matas
Presented to a forum at The National Archives, Ottawa
I want to express my appreciation for the remarks of Ethan Gutmann and Damon Noto.  I have been on this file for over eight years now and it is a relief to have colleagues as informed and articulate as Ethan and Damon joining me and David Kilgour in our efforts. 
Today I am not going to talk about the evidence.  I start with an assumption that you are either convinced by my colleague or at least troubled enough by what they said to want to do something about it. The question I want to address is what that something in Canada might be.

Canada Raises Organ Harvesting at UN

OTTAWA—Canada formally acknowledged reports that the Chinese regime is engaged in organ harvesting without consent for the first time at the United Nations on Wednesday.

Canada’s statements at the United Nations are often noteworthy for their specificity and forcefulness, a trend that continued last week.

Canada’s comments were the only ones to prompt response from specific countries, as most other countries speak in generalities and those with documented abuses use the opportunity to make couched statements that deflect from their own human rights issues.

Canada’s human rights adviser at the U.N., Anne-Tamara Lorre, set the precedent during the Interactive Dialogue on Freedom of Religion at the U.N. in Geneva. The dialogue was focused on reports from two human rights-related special rapporteurs at the 22nd meeting of the current session of the Human Rights Council.

Irwin Cotler Aims to Curb Gruesome Trade

By Epoch Times

PARLIAMENT HILL, Ottawa—Liberal MP Irwin Cotler has introduced a bill to crackdown on those who trade in human organs, take part in organ harvesting, or get a transplant without making sure the organs were willingly donated.

With the relative ease of organ transplants, a new and gruesome trade has arisen around the life-and-death operations and organs that make them possible.

It’s a brave new world, without regulation and very little oversight outside of the professional associations of surgeons and transplant professionals that have begun addressing the issue. But while the medical community has started to face this new reality, most governments have not. It’s a situation Cotler’s bill aims at addressing for Canadians.